Gina Hyams Author

Corn Query

‘Tis the season and I want to make the most of it. I’ve heard that boiling corn with a splash of milk makes it extra sweet. Do any of you have corn cooking tips or favorite recipes?

5 Responses to Corn Query

  1. Dan Shaw says:

    I deleted the other one because of too many typos…

    My mother’s method is foolproof and simple and for some reason many people are resistant to it.

    Fill a pot with cold water about 2/3. Add shucked corn. Turn heat to high. When the water reaches the boil, the corn is ready.

    Also, I think the Barefoot Contessa’s corn salad is perfect, though I like to add halved cherry tomatoes sometimes to it

  2. Tana Butler says:

    I cook corn off the cob in a light sauté with butter, Persian lime olive oil, and cilantro. Salt and pepper to taste. You could also add halved cherry tomatoes and some kind of bean—my most recent version had yellow wax beans. Romanos are also excellent.

    You could also do lemon olive oil with cherry tomatoes and basil. Heavenly!

    (Stonehouse is the best oil, but it’s been unavailable for a couple of weeks.)

  3. Gina Hyams says:

    Wow. Yum to you both.

  4. Gina Hyams says:

    I’m going to give the Barefoot Contessa’s Fresh Corn Salad a try today. Here’s the recipe:

    5 ears corn, shucked

    1/2 cup small-diced red onion (1 small onion)

    3 tablespoons cider vinegar

    3 tablespoons good olive oil

    1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

    1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper

    1/2 cup chiffonade fresh basil leaves (directions follow)

    In a large pot of boiling salted water, cook the corn for 3 minutes until the starchiness is just gone.

    Drain and immerse it in ice water to stop the cooking and to set the color.

    When the corn is cool, cut the kernels off the cob, cutting close to the cob. (Yes, you can use leftover, cooked and cooled corn.)

    Toss the kernels in a large bowl with the red onions, vinegar, olive oil, salt and pepper. Just before serving, toss in the fresh basil.

    Taste for seasonings and serve cold or at room temperature.

    Makes about 4 or 5 servings.

    To make chiffonade: Stack basil leaves, then cut across the stack to make small “ribbons.”

  5. rebecca says:

    Oh lord, I’d make that just to be able to say “chiffonade.”

    Don’t get me started on corn! I’m from Ohio, doncha know. But I do know you need TWO essential, for perfect COTC: Plastic corn-shaped corn cob holders, and a Butter Boy.

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