Gina Hyams Author

Interview with Pie Evangelist Beth Howard

Beth Howard: Pie Baker, Writer, TV Producer, Host

Before becoming known as a pie evangelist, Beth Howard had a long career as a journalist (Shape, Elle, etc.), PR executive (from Hyatt Hotels to “Beverly Hills, 90210”), and web producer (2002 Olympics, MSN.com, Quokka Sports). Needing a break from the long hours behind her computer, Beth quit a six-figure job to spend a year on a pie-baking sabbatical in Malibu, California, where she baked pies for the stars. Today, she blends her pie passion with her media background, blogging about the pie life, writing a pie memoir, teaching pie skills through her pie party business, and developing a pie TV series, all under the name The World Needs More Pie.

TV Series Synopsis

Pie is comfort. Pie builds community. Pie heals. Pie can change the world. That is what Beth Howard, journalist, blogger, and former pie baker to the stars in Malibu, always believed. But when her 43-year-old husband dies suddenly and unexpectedly, she must put her theory to a personal test. As part of her grieving process she packs up the RV her husband left behind and hits the American highways and byways in search of the real healing powers of pie. During Beth’s journey, documented in the forthcoming TV series “The World Needs More Pie,” she interviews an eclectic array of people – pie bakers, shop owners, apple growers, social activists, philanthropists, cartoonists, song writers, 92-year-old grandmothers, and even a pie-delivering bike messenger – people who make the world a happier place, and who help Beth ease her grief, all because of an iconic American dessert.  “The World Needs More Pie” is a docu-reality series of one-hour episodes co-produced by Emmy Award-winning producer/cameraperson Janice Molinari and co-produced and hosted by Beth Howard.

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Gina: Can you talk about how focusing on pie has helped you cope with the loss of your husband?

Beth: A mentor of mine always preaches, ‘If you’re feeling blue do something nice for others.  I interpret ‘nice’ to mean ‘bake pies and give them away.’ Since my husband died unexpectedly seven months ago, I have been feeling verrrrrrrry blue and as a result I have been baking a lot of pie lately and giving it all away. In fact, on National Pie Day (January 23, 2010), I baked 50 pies and handed free slices out to strangers on the streets of LA. That’s 400 slices of pie. That made me feel a little better.  At least for that day.  If only every day could be National Pie Day! But also, Marcus loved my pie and he was very supportive of me writing my pie memoir. He was reading my manuscript up until the day he died. Knowing that he wanted to see me get this book published keeps me going.

Gina: Why do you love pie?

Beth: Why pie? I am still asking myself this. I love many baked goods – brownies, chocolate chip cookies, carrot cake – but there is something truly special about pie. I think it has something to do with a nostalgia that goes way beyond our parents and grandparents. Maybe because pie’s origins go way back to the Egyptians and Romans it’s baked deep in our DNA.

Gina: What is your fondest pie memory?

Beth: Age 8, Banana Cream Pie, The Canteen Lunch in the Alley, Ottumwa, Iowa. I was with my dad and four siblings. My dad was in charge because my mom was in the hospital.  We all sat around a horseshoe shaped counter on bar stools. We each got our own whole heaping-high piece of pie. And that was after eating Maid-Rite hamburgers. Banana Cream is my dad’s favorite pie by far. My mom got my dad to marry her because she made him of this pie. So I wouldn’t have been born if not for banana cream pie. Thus, all my memories of banana cream are fond ones. But The Canteen Lunch in the Alley was where my pie initiation began. And, by the way, the place is still there – check it out!

Gina: What is your favorite kind of pie?

Beth: My favorite pie is apple crumble. And blueberry. And blackberry. And peach.  And…you get the idea.

Gina: What is the oddest pie you’ve made, seen, or heard about?

Beth: Stargazy pie from England, where whole fish are laid under the top crust with their heads poking out, eyes looking up toward the stars.  Truly disturbing. There’s a pic in my blog post from when I heard about it, though never actually saw or ate one.

Gina: Have you ever participated in or judged a pie contest? Please tell me about your experiences. Do you have any competition tips?

Beth: No, I’ve never judged a contest of any kind, which makes me especially  nervous to go straight to the National Pie Championships as a novice judge! I feel sorry for the contestants who get me for a judge because not only do I have a hard time making decisions (I’m a Gemini), I am not terribly discriminating when it comes to pie because, basically, I like almost any pie I eat!

Gina: What criteria should pie judges consider? Is there a proper technique to tasting pie?

Beth: Pie should look (and taste) like it’s made with love. You can always tell. Pie should reflect life; it should be slightly imperfect – it should look homemade. It shouldn’t be too fancy, no manicured or coiffed crusts, it’s not a French pastry going to a ball; it’s hardy American fare so the crust should look a little, shall we say, rough around the edges. Proper tasting technique is this: always, always, always chew with your mouth closed. And use a napkin to wipe your mouth. Please.

Gina: What is the secret to a perfect crust?

Beth: Butter. End of discussion. Okay, that and do not, I repeat, DO NOT overwork the dough!

Gina: Do you think great bakers are born rather than made? Can anybody learn to make pie? What personality traits make for the best pie bakers?

Beth: Anyone can learn to make pie. However, in my teaching experience, I’ve learned that pie making is well suited to people who are not perfectionists, not overachievers, not Type-A.  (These types almost always overwork their dough.)  Pie making is good for free spirited, creative types who are not afraid to ignore recipes, break rules, improvise, and who are open to experimentation. Overall, I see pie making as an equal-opportunity, all-access, all-age activity.

Gina: Why does pie matter today?

Beth: Pie makes people happy, happy people want to do nice things for others, when everyone is doing nice things for each other all the time there can be no war, and therefore pie can save the world.

4 Responses to Interview with Pie Evangelist Beth Howard

  1. Shelley says:

    A fine interview. I like the idea of pie as the route to peace. Perhaps if we all practice this Peace of Pie doctrine the only fighting among nations will be cream pie fights!

  2. Shelley says:

    PS: Stargazy pie is a medieval dish, hence the oddness.

  3. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Tana Butler, Jean Martha , Jean Martha , Gina Hyams, Dana Tommasino and others. Dana Tommasino said: RT @ginahyams: Awesome interview with @worldneedspie http://tinyurl.com/yhvhajs (pie embedded in our DNA, fish heads embedded in pie, pie will save world) […]

  4. […] it now. Gina Hyams, an East Coast-based pie writer has recently done interviews with Portland-based Beth Howard of theworldneedsmorepie.com, and Tricia Martin, the founder of Portland’s “Pietopia” […]

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